How to find someone’s email address


Posted on March 8, 2018 in Growth, Sales

Sometimes you need to email someone but you don’t have their email address.

Sure, you could go about tweeting at them, or DMing them, or messaging them on LinkedIn for it, but doesn’t that seem a bit counter-intuitive? If you have them there, then why not go ahead and ask your question there?

If your question needs to go via email, then there are a few great ways to find it for free and quickly.

These are my email finding ninja skills that I am sharing with you. I built links professionally for a few years and learned how to find them manually first. Now tools have replaced a lot of that work, but it can still be a fun challenge.

Hunter.io

Hunter.io is the best tool on the market for finding someone’s email address. Hunter’s tag line is “Connect with anyone”. It is a free tool (up to 100 searches a month) that you can use to plug in a domain and receive back a list of emails.

If you don’t sign up, you’ll get results back that are slightly redacted.

If you do sign up, then you receive them unredacted.

But the ninja way to do this quicker is to install their Chrome extension. With the extension installed, you can visit a website and click the extension to see the email addresses they have found associated with that domain. Here’s mine, for example.

Let’s see who else we can find.

Pat Flynn of Smart Passive Income? You bet (though you’ll get his assistant):

Zillow’s COO? Yep.

They’re not perfect. For example you can’t find Tim Ferriss’s from his new tim.blog domain (though you can find it another way).

Gmail

If Hunter doesn’t get you what you need, then you can resort to good old Gmail. Google has actually done an amazing job of associating Google+ profile photos with email addresses, so when you hit the right one you can be pretty sure that it’s correct.

This is relatively easy to do when you already know one person’s email at a company (it’s much harder to do if they don’t have a professional email and instead use Gmail).

Let’s use Tim Ferriss as an example. I start by doing these combinations:

  • first@domain.com
  • first(lastinitial)@domain.com (eg timf@tim.blog or timf@thefourhourworkweek.com)
  • first.last@domain.com
  • (firstinital)last@domain.com (eg tferriss@thefourhourworkweek.com)

With Tim, I’ve thus struck out.

If you strike out there, then you need to get a bit more imaginative. Lucky for us, most people are not super imaginative with their emails and social media handles.

The next combinations I try are:

  • firstlast@gmail.com (EVERYONE has a Gmail these days)
  • first.last@gmail.com
  • brand@gmail.com

In Tim’s case, both the second and third hit:

Now please don’t go emailing Tim just because you found his email here (if you’ve read The Four Hour Work Week you know an assistant manages it. I’ve emailed with her multiple times. She’s very nice), but now you know my strategy for finding someone’s email just using Gmail.

Google searches

If for some reason you’ve struck out with the above, you get to resort to good old Google. It’s been a long time since anyone has talked about advanced search operators, so let me show you how I use them.

  • Site:domain.com will return only results within the domain you put (eg site:getcredo.com)
  • A term in quotes like “john doherty” will only return results that have those two words together
  • To find an email, then you can also include “@domain.com” to help narrow down your results

Let’s see what we get:

Hmm, nothing yet. But finding the email from this is not that hard now especially since Google has expanded the number of characters in meta description (from 160 to 320) and they also are more frequently replacing standard meta descriptions with content pulled from the page that they think is more relevant to your query.

Really, they’re making your email hunting easier.

Simply conduct a search on that page (CTRL+F on PC, CMD+F on Mac) and voila:

I even make it harder for people to find my email by not writing it out completely. A lot of people are not that careful, but when someone is you can do these three searches:

  • @domain.com
  • at domain.com
  • at domain dot com

I can almost guarantee that one of these will pull it up for you. Like, I’m 99% sure this will find you their email especially if it is a business email.

If you cannot find their business email and you suspect they are using a Gmail for it, then swap out the third part of your query (@domain.com) and simply do @gmail.com. Then instead of searching @domain.com and the two other combinations above, do gmail.com instead of domain.com.


Has this post been helpful for you? What email can you not find? I’d love to help out and learn with you!